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William S. Richardson School of Law

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William S. Richardson School of Law
Parent school University of Hawaii at Manoa
Established
School type
Dean
Location Honolulu, HI, US
Enrollment
Faculty (See List)
Annual tuition
Website
Outlines 5 (See List)


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File:Williamsrichardson.jpg
William S. Richardson School of Law was named after the first native Hawaiian chief justice of the HawaiTemplate:Okinai State Supreme Court. Richardson served from 1966 to 1982. In defense of his stance against commercial over-development, he is most famous for saying, "The western concept of exclusivity is not universally applicable in HawaiTemplate:Okinai."

The William S. Richardson School of Law is a public, co-educational institution of the [[University of Hawaii at Manoa|University of HawaiTemplate:Okinai at Mānoa]] in [[Honolulu, Hawaii|Honolulu, HawaiTemplate:Okinai]] and is one of the leading law schools in the United States. Named after the beloved [[Hawaii State Supreme Court|HawaiTemplate:Okinai State Supreme Court]] Chief Justice William S. Richardson, it is the only law school in the [[Hawaii|State of HawaiTemplate:Okinai]]. It is fully accredited by the American Bar Association and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools.

The William S. Richardson School of Law has adopted a mission of promoting justice, ethical responsibility and public service with special emphasis on field of law of particular importance to [[Hawaii|HawaiTemplate:Okinai]] and the Pacific Rim region including environmental law, rights of native Hawaiians, maritime law and Pacific and Asian legal systems. There are approximately 270 students with an average of 90 students in each class, taught by 22 permanent faculty.

Establishment

The William S. Richardson School of Law was established by an act of the [[Hawaii Legislature|HawaiTemplate:Okinai State Legislature]] in 1968 and welcomed its first doctor of jurisprudence candidates in 1973. There were fifty-three students in the first class, including John D. Waihee III, future [[Governor of Hawaii|Governor of HawaiTemplate:Okinai]]. In 1974, the American Bar Association granted provisional accreditation and then received full accreditation in 1982. In 1983, the William S. Richardson School of Law moved into new facilities on the campus of the University of HawaiTemplate:Okinai at Mānoa.

Recent developments

  • Justice Kennedy visited in Spring of 2006 as part of the school's Jurist-in-Residence program.
  • The William S. Richardson School of Law was ranked in the top tier as one of America's Top Law Schools in 2004 by Law School 100.
  • The U.S. News and World Report ranked it as one of America's Best Graduate Schools for 2005.
  • In 2003, Aviam Soifer became the law school's newest Dean.
  • The William S. Richardson School of Law was ranked 97th among the top 100 law schools in the U.S. by U.S. News & World Report.
  • The William S. Richardson School of Law, NALSA team, comprised of Anosh Yaqoob and Scott Hovey, captured the 2007 National Native American Law Student Association Moot Court National Championship in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota. Mr. Yaqoob also garnered the 2nd Place Best Oralist Award.

Contact

William S. Richardson School of Law 2515 Dole Street Honolulu, Hawai'i 96822-2328

Resources