Difference between revisions of "University of California, Los Angeles School of Law"

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{{Infobox Law School
 
{{Infobox Law School
| nickname                    =  
+
|class_canceled=Yes
| image                      =  
+
|temp_pass_fail_grading=Yes
| motto                      =  
+
|pass_fail_grading_notes=All Spring 2020 courses, except for clinic courses or other courses that completed most of their evaluation prior to the COVID-19 disruption (i.e. prior to Spring Break), will be graded pass/fail.
| parent                      = University of California, Los Angeles
+
|pass_fail_grading_url=https://www.reddit.com/r/LawSchool/comments/fjp4kt/complete_list_of_grading_changes_corona_spring/fllw7o5/
| established                 = 1949
+
|type=Public
| type                        = Public
+
|established=1949
| endowment                   = 1,880
+
|parent=University of California, Los Angeles
| dean                       = Rachel Moran
+
|endowment=1,880
| street_address             = 385 Charles E Young Dr E
+
|dean=Jennifer L. Mnookin
| city                       = Los Angeles
+
|street_address=385 Charles E Young Dr E
| state                       = CA
+
|city=Los Angeles
| country                     = US
+
|state=CA
| full_time_students          = 999
+
|country=US
| part_time_students          =  
+
|geocode_fail=No
| full_time_faculty           = 76
+
|full_time_students=999
| adjunct_faculty             = 35
+
|full_time_faculty=76
| ranking                     = 16
+
|adjunct_faculty=35
| tier                        =  
+
|ranking=15
| bar_pass_rate               = 85
+
|bar_pass_rate=88
| lsat_75_percentile         = 170
+
|lsat_75_percentile=170
| median_lsat                 = 168
+
|median_lsat=168
| lsat_25_percentile         = 165
+
|lsat_25_percentile=165
| gpa_75_percentile           = 3.87
+
|gpa_75_percentile=3.87
| median_gpa                 = 3.77
+
|median_gpa=3.77
| gpa_25_percentile           = 3.56
+
|gpa_25_percentile=3.56
| underemployment_score      =
+
|subsidized_annual_tuition=44,922
| library                    =
+
|unsubsidized_annual_tuition=54,767
| subsidized_annual_tuition   = 44,922
+
|tuition_subsidy_basis=State residency
| unsubsidized_annual_tuition = 54,767
+
|website=www.law.ucla.edu
| tuition_subsidy_basis       = State residency
 
| website                     = www.law.ucla.edu
 
| aba_profile                =
 
 
}}
 
}}
{{Law School Stub}}
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The '''UCLA School of Law,''' also referred to as '''UCLA Law''', is one of 12 professional schools<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.ucla.edu/academics/graduate-and-professional-education|title=Graduate & Professional Education &#124; UCLA}}</ref> at the University of California, Los Angeles. UCLA Law has been consistently ranked by ''U.S. News & World Report'' as one of the top 20 law schools in the United States since the inception of the ''U.S. News'' rankings in 1987. Its 17,000 alumni include more judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit than any other law school, as well as leaders in private law practice, government service, the judiciary, sports and entertainment law, and public interest law. As part of a renowned public university, the school's mission is to provide an excellent legal education while expanding access to the legal professional to those who otherwise would not be able to pursue a legal degree.<ref name="grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com">{{cite web|url=http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/university-of-california-los-angeles-03018|title=How Does University of California--Los Angeles School of Law Rank Among America's Best Law Schools?|publisher=}}</ref> The dean of the school is [https://law.ucla.edu/faculty/faculty-profiles/jennifer-l-mnookin/ Jennifer L. Mnookin.], an evidence scholar who joined the UCLA Law faculty in 2005 and became the school's ninth dean, and third female dean, in 2015.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/jennifer-mnookin-named-new-dean-of-ucla-school-of-law|title=Jennifer Mnookin named new dean of UCLA School of Law}}</ref>
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==History==
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Founded in 1949, the UCLA School of Law is the third oldest of the five [[:Category: Law schools|law schools]] within the University of California system.
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In the 1930s, initial efforts to establish a law school at UCLA went nowhere as a result of resistance from UC President [[Robert Gordon Sproul]], and because UCLA's supporters eventually refocused their efforts on first adding [[David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA|medical]] and [[UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science|engineering schools]].<ref name="Dundjerski1">{{cite book |last1=Dundjerski |first1=Marina |title=UCLA: The First Century |date=2011 |publisher=Third Millennium Publishing |location=Los Angeles |isbn=9781906507374 |page=117 |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=WbLr-4QteEYC&pg=PA117 |accessdate=24 February 2019}}</ref>
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During the mid-1940s, the impetus for the creation of the UCLA School of Law emerged from outside of the UCLA community.  Assemblyman William Rosenthal of [[Boyle Heights, Los Angeles|Boyle Heights]] (on the other side of Los Angeles from UCLA) conceived of and fought for the creation of the first public law school in [[Southern California]] as a convenient and affordable alternative to the expensive [[USC Gould School of Law|private law school at USC]].<ref name="Rastorfer">{{cite journal |last1=Rastorfer |first1=Renee Y. |title=Thomas S. Dabagh and the Institutional Beginnings of the UCLA Law Library: A Cautionary Tale |journal=Law Library Journal |date=Summer 2003 |volume=95 |issue=3 |pages=347–368 |url=https://works.bepress.com/aallcallforpapers/23/ |accessdate=19 February 2019}}</ref><ref name="Dundjerski2">{{cite book |last1=Dundjerski |first1=Marina |title=UCLA: The First Century |date=2011 |publisher=Third Millennium Publishing |location=Los Angeles |isbn=9781906507374 |page=118 |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=WbLr-4QteEYC&pg=PA118 |accessdate=24 February 2019}}</ref><ref name="Dewey">{{cite journal |last1=Dewey |first1=Scott Hamilton |title=Growing Pains: The History of the UCLA Law Library, 1949-2000 |journal=Law Library Journal |date=May 2016 |volume=108 |issue=2 |pages=217–236 |url=https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303712043 |accessdate=19 February 2019}}</ref>  Rosenthal's first attempt in 1945 failed, but his second attempt was able to gain momentum when the [[State Bar of California]] and the UCLA Alumni Association announced their support for the bill.<ref name="Dundjerski2" /> On July 18, 1947, Governor [[Earl Warren]] authorized the appropriation of $1 million for the construction of a new law school at UCLA by signing Assembly Bill 1361 into [[Law of California|state law]].<ref name="Rastorfer" /><ref name="Dundjerski2" /><ref name="Dewey" />
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The search for the law school's first dean was difficult and delayed its opening by a year.<ref name="Dundjerski2" />  UCLA's Law School Planning Committee prioritized merit, while the then-conservative [[Regents of the University of California]] prioritized political beliefs.<ref name="Rastorfer" />  Another factor was a simultaneous deanship vacancy at [[UC Berkeley School of Law|Berkeley Law]].<ref name="Dundjerski2" />  Near the end of 1948, the Committee finally identified a sufficiently conservative candidate willing to take the job: L. Dale Coffman, then the dean of [[Vanderbilt University Law School]].<ref name="Rastorfer" />  The Regents believed Coffman would help bring balance to the UCLA campus, which they saw as overrun by [[Communist Party USA|Communists]].<ref name="Rastorfer" />
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Dean Coffman was able to recruit several distinguished faculty to UCLA, including [[Roscoe Pound]], [[Brainerd Currie]], Rollin M. Perkins, and Harold Verrall.<ref name="Rastorfer" /><ref name="Dundjerski2" />  To build a [[law library]], he hired Thomas S. Dabagh, then the law librarian of the Los Angeles County Law Library.<ref name="Rastorfer" /><ref name="Dundjerski2" /> The UCLA School of Law officially opened in September 1949 in temporary quarters in former military barracks behind Royce Hall, and moved into a permanent home upon the completion of the original Law Building in 1951.<ref name="Rastorfer" /><ref name="Dundjerski2" /><ref name="Dewey" />
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Coffman's deanship did not end well, due to his vindictive and strongly prejudiced personality.<ref name="Rastorfer" /><ref name="Dundjerski2" /><ref name="Dewey" />  One sign of early trouble was when he drove out Dabagh in 1952 after they could not bridge their fundamental differences over how to run the law library, which was widely regarded around the UCLA community as contributing to Dabagh's early death in 1959.<ref name="Rastorfer" /> On September 21, 1955, the faculty revolted in the form of a memorandum to Chancellor [[Raymond B. Allen]] alleging that Coffman was categorically [[Antisemitism|refusing to hire Jews]] or anyone he perceived to be leftist, and that the school's reputation was deteriorating because Coffman's abrasive personality had led to excessive faculty [[Turnover (employment)|turnover]].<ref name="Rastorfer" /><ref name="Dewey" />  On May 24, 1956, Coffman was stripped of his deanship after a lengthy investigation by a panel of deans of his biases and his "dictatorial, undemocratic, and autocratic" management style.<ref name="Rastorfer" />  He remained on the faculty until his forced retirement in 1973, but continued to face allegations as late as 1971 that he was "an unreconstructed [[McCarthyism|McCarthyite]] and [[Racial segregation in the United States|pro-segregationist]]."<ref name="Dewey" />
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Coffman's successor was Richard C. Maxwell, who served as the second dean of UCLA Law from 1958 to 1969.<ref name="Moidel">{{cite journal |last1=Moidel |first1=Selma Moidel |title=The UCLA School of Law - Origin, Conflict, and Growth |journal=California Legal History |date=2016 |volume=11 |pages=1–6 |url=https://www.cschs.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Legal-Hist-v.-11-Introduction.pdf |accessdate=24 February 2019}}</ref>  Dean Maxwell "presided over happier, more harmonious years of institutional growth,"<ref name="Dewey" /> and it was under his deanship that UCLA became "the youngest top-ranked law school in the country."<ref name="Moidel" />  Dabagh's successor, Louis Piacenza, was able to grow the law school's library collection to 143,000 volumes by May 1963, which at that time was the 14th largest law school library in the United States.<ref name="Dewey" />
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By 1963, the law school had 600 students in a building designed for 550, and the Law Building's deficiencies had become all too evident, such as a complete lack of [[air conditioning]].<ref name="Dewey" />  In October 1963, the law school administration announced a major remodeling and expansion project, which added air conditioning and a new wing to the building. During the 1960s, the law school grew so quickly that the new wing was already insufficient upon its completion in January 1967.<ref name="Dewey" /> From its founding to the end of the 20th century, UCLA Law struggled with severe overcrowding, as librarians, faculty, staff, and as many as 18 student organizations—at one point, more than any other law school in the United States—competed for limited space in the Law Building for books, classes, conferences, and offices.<ref name="Dewey" />  After four grueling years of construction, the chronic space shortage was ultimately relieved by the completion of the new Hugh and Hazel Darling Law Library on January 22, 2000.<ref name="Dewey" />
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==Academics==
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UCLA Law has approximately 950 students in its [[Juris Doctor]] (J.D.) program and 200 students in its Masters of Law (LL.M.) program, which is popular among foreign students intending to take the California Bar Exam. It also offers a Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) program for students who already have a J.D. and hope to become law professors.
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The school was a pioneer in clinical legal education and today offers a strong experiential education program. Through clinical courses and related offerings, the school gives students the opportunity to directly represent clients in a variety of settings while under expert supervision. UCLA Law's clinics also provide service to many people who cannot afford to pay for their own legal services, including veterans, the homeless, and indigent individuals appearing in criminal and immigration courts. In 2017, the school opened the [https://law.ucla.edu/academics/clinical-and-experiential-programs/documentary-film-legal-clinic/ Documentary Film Legal Clinic] and [https://law.ucla.edu/academics/clinical-and-experiential-programs/music-industry-clinic/ Music Industry Clinic], which provide legal services to aspiring visual journalists, musicians and entrepreneurs in the arts, and the [https://law.ucla.edu/academics/clinical-and-experiential-programs/veterans-legal-clinic/ Veterans Justice Clinic] at the [[West Los Angeles VA Medical Center]].
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UCLA Law offers the only [https://law.ucla.edu/centers/social-policy/critical-race-studies/about/ Critical Race Studies] program in the country, focusing on the intersection between race and law. It also has a robust public interest program, offering TK. Its most prominent centers, programs and institutes include the Critical Race Studies program, the [https://law.ucla.edu/centers/social-policy/david-j-epstein-program-in-public-interest-law-and-policy/about/ David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy;] the Emmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment; the Lowell Milken Institute on Business Law and Policy; the Promise Institute for Human Rights; the Resnick Center for Food Law and Policy; the Williams Institute on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Public Policy; and the Ziffren Center on Media, Entertainment, Technology and Sports Law.
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Students can elect to specialize in Business Law and Policy, Entertainment Law, Environmental Law, Public Interest Law, Critical Race Studies, and Law and Philosophy. The roughly 300 students who begin Law School at UCLA every year are divided into sections to encourage a sense of community. Students take all of their first year courses with their sections.<ref>Cynthia L. Cooper, ''The Insider's Guide to the Top Fifteen Law Schools'' (New York: Doubleday, 1990), 343 & 345.</ref>
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Several joint degree programs are available, which require four years of study and result in the simultaneous award of a [[Juris Doctor]] and master's degree in Afro-American Studies, American Indian Studies, Law and Management, Public Health, Public Policy, Philosophy, Social Welfare, and Urban Planning.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.law.ucla.edu/academics/degrees-and-specializations/|title=Joint Degree Programs|last=|first=|date=|work=UCLA Law School website|accessdate=March 6, 2011}}</ref>
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==Faculty and Students==
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UCLA School of Law has a faculty of over 100 members with expertise in all major disciplines of law, representing "one of the most diverse in the country."<ref name="Cooper, 345">Cooper, 345.</ref> Thirteen members of the school's tenured faculty have been recognized for being the most-cited scholars in their areas of specialty.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://law.ucla.edu/news-and-events/in-the-news/2016/08/13-ucla-law-faculty-among-most-cited-legal-scholars/#!|title=13 UCLA Law Faculty Among Most Cited Legal Scholars|website=law.ucla.edu|access-date=2017-11-12}}</ref> The school faculty is ranked 11th<ref>{{Cite journal|title=Scholarly Impact of Law School Faculties in 2018: Updating the Leiter Score Ranking for the Top Third|ssrn = 3230371|year = 2018|last1 = Zeman|first1 = Nicole|last2 = Veenis|first2 = Katherine|last3 = Catlin|first3 = Nicole|last4 = Sisk|first4 = Gregory C.}}</ref> for scholarship, up from 15th in 2010 and 13th in 2013.
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In 2018, 6,243 students applied to attend UCLA Law, and 311 were enrolled.<ref name="UCLA Law Class Profile">{{Cite web|url=https://law.ucla.edu/admissions/class-profile/|title=UCLA Law Class Profile}}</ref> The average LSAT score for members of the entering Class of 2018 is 168. The average LSAT score for students in the 75th percentile is 169, and 165 for students in the 25th percentile it is 165. The average GPA for members of the entering Class of 2018 is 3.72. The average GPA score for students in the 75th percentile is 3.85, and for students in the 25th percentile it is 3.52.
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{| class="wikitable"
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|-
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! J.D. Entering Class of 2018 Profile<ref name="law.ucla.edu">{{cite web|url=https://www.law.ucla.edu/about-ucla-law/school-facts/|title=School Facts|publisher=}}</ref>
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|-
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|
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*123 Undergraduate schools represented
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*52% Female; 48% Male
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*41% Students of color
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*58% California Residents; 42% Non-residents
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*10% majored in engineering, technology, science or math
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*14% are the first in their families to have completed college
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|}
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==International Human Rights Law Program==
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The International Human Rights Law Program, founded in 2008, is an organization for human rights education, scholarship, advocacy, and policy-oriented research.<ref>[http://www.law.ucla.edu/home/index.asp?page=2730 International Human Rights Law Program | Centers &amp; Programs | UCLA Law]</ref> It includes the [[Sanela Diana Jenkins]] International Justice Clinic,<ref>[http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2008/09/18/state/n122918D45.DTL “Bosnian's $4 million funds UCLA war crimes clinic,” [[San Francisco Chronicle]], September 18, 2008]</ref> which assists in the apprehension and prosecution of alleged war criminals in Bosnia, initially focusing on the relations between [[Ratko Mladic]], formerly head of the [[Bosnian Serb Army]], and others accused of involvement in the [[Srebrenica massacre]]. [[Haris Silajdžić]], President of [[Bosnia and Herzegovina]], will work closely with the program.<ref>[http://www.international.ucla.edu/euro/article.asp?parentid=97853 UCLA Today Online, September 22, 2008]</ref>
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==Location==
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[[File:UCLA School of Law south entrance.jpg|thumb|right|UCLA School of Law's south entrance facing Charles E. Young Drive East]]
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UCLA School of Law is located on the [[UCLA]] campus in the [[Westwood, Los Angeles, California|Westwood]] area of Los Angeles.<ref>Cooper, 359.</ref> The school is located approximately five miles from the Pacific Ocean and 12 miles from downtown Los Angeles. The UCLA campus sits in the foothills of the [[Santa Monica Mountains]], between the communities of [[Brentwood, Los Angeles, California|Brentwood]] to the west, [[Bel Air, Los Angeles|Bel Air]] to the north, [[Holmby Hills, Los Angeles, California|Holmby Hills]] to the east and [[Westwood, Los Angeles|Westwood]] to the south. The school is easily accessible via [[Wilshire Boulevard]], [[Sunset Boulevard]] and [[Interstate 405 (California)|Interstate 405]].
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The school proper is housed in a three-story brick building, with the library tower extending to four stories. A few offices, including the [https://law.ucla.edu/careers/office-of-career-services/ Office of Career Services], the [https://law.ucla.edu/admissions/ Office of Admissions] and the [https://law.ucla.edu/llm-sjd/office-of-graduate-studies-and-international-programs/ Office of Graduate Studies and International Programs], are housed in an adjacent building, Dodd Hall.
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==Rankings==
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{{see also|Law school rankings in the United States}}
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In 2019, ''[[US News & World Report]]'' ranked UCLA as 15th among U.S. law schools,<ref name="US News" /> 4th in environmental law and 8th in tax law.<ref name="US News" />
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According to [[Brian Leiter]]'s Law School rankings, UCLA Law ranks 8th in the nation in terms of scholarly impact as measured by academic [[citation]]s of tenure-stream faculty during the years 2009–2013.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.leiterrankings.com/faculty/2014_scholarlyimpact.shtml|title=New Document|publisher=}}</ref>
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''[[The Hollywood Reporter]]'' ranked UCLA the number one school for entertainment law in its inaugural 2012 rankings, and every year from 2014 through 2019.<ref>{{cite web|title=America's Top Ten Entertainment Law Schools|url=http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/americas-top-10-entertainment-law-351304|work=The Hollywood Reporter |first=Matthew |last=Belloni |date=July 20, 2012 |accessdate=3 February 2014}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|last1=Kirby|first1=Brandon|title=Power Lawyers 2014: The Top 12 Entertainment Law Schools for Hollywood|url=http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/top-entertainment-law-schools-2014-699512|work=The Hollywood Reporter|accessdate=6 June 2014|date=April 30, 2014}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|last1=Porreca|first1=Brian|title=Top 12 Entertainment Law Schools Revealed|url=http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/top-12-entertainment-law-schools-792255|work=The Hollywood Reporter|accessdate=13 March 2017|date=April 29, 2015}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|last1=Porreca|first1=Brian|title=Top Law Schools: 11 Colleges and Universities Where Hollywood's Power Lawyers Got Started|url=http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/lists/top-law-schools-11-colleges-886105/item/ucla-law-school-top-law-886083|work=The Hollywood Reporter|accessdate=13 March 2017|date=April 22, 2016}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|last1=Porreca|first1=Brian|title=Hollywood's Top Law Schools: 12 Colleges and Universities Where THR's Power Lawyers Got Started|work=The Hollywood Reporter|url=http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/lists/hollywood-s-top-law-schools-12-colleges-universities-thr-s-power-lawyers-got-started-997840/item/ucla-school-law-power-lawyer-schools-997838|accessdate=31 May 2017|date=May 2, 2017}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|last1=Porreca|first1=Brian|title=The Top 10 Entertainment Law Schools 2018, Ranked|work=The Hollywood Reporter|url=https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/lists/top-10-entertainment-law-schools-2018-ranked-1099427|accessdate=28 April 2018|date=April 5, 2018}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|last=THR Staff|title=Hollywood's Top Law Schools: 10 Colleges and Universities Where THR's Power Lawyers Got Started|work=The Hollywood Reporter|url=https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/lists/hollywoods-top-law-schools-10-colleges-universities-1195794/item/top-law-schools-harvard-law-school-1195796|accessdate=April 20, 2019|date=April 1, 2019}}</ref>
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===Bar passage rates===
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In July 2017, UCLA Law's bar passage was 88%,<ref name="UCLA Law Class Profile"/> compared to a statewide average for first-time test-takers of 62%.
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[[American Bar Association]] data shows that  (94%) of 2017 graduates had secured full-time, long-term, JD-required employment within ten months of graduation.
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==Journals==
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===Journals and law reviews===
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* ''[[UCLA Law Review]]''
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* ''UCLA Asian/Pacific American Law Journal''
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* ''UCLA Chicana/o-Latina/o Law Review''
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* ''UCLA Criminal Justice Law Review''
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*''UCLA Disability Law Journal''
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* ''UCLA Dukeminier Awards Journal of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law''
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* ''UCLA Entertainment Law Review''
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* UCLA Indigenous Peoples' Journal of Law, Culture & Resistance
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*''[[UCLA Journal of Environmental Law and Policy]]''
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* ''UCLA Journal of International Law & Foreign Affairs''
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* ''UCLA Journal of Islamic and Near Eastern Law''
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* ''UCLA Journal of Law & Technology''
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*''UCLA National Black Law Journal''
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*''UCLA Pacific Basin Law Journal''
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* ''UCLA Women's Law Journal''
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==Notable people==
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=== Alumni (Graduates) ===
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====Academia====
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* [[Drucilla Cornell]] – professor, [[Rutgers University]], in political science, comparative literature, and women's studies (2001–); former professor of law at [[Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law]] (1989–1994) and [[Rutgers School of Law–Newark]] (1994–2001)
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* [[Joshua Dressler]] – professor, [[Moritz College of Law]], [[Ohio State University]] (2001–); prominent author in criminal law and criminal procedure
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* [[Richard D. Freer]] – professor, [[Emory University School of Law]] (1983–); expert in civil procedure
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* [[Eric Goldman]] - professor, [[Santa Clara University School of Law]] (2006-); expert in [[Legal aspects of computing|Internet law]]
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* [[Richard L. Hasen]] – Chancellor's Professor, [[University of California, Irvine School of Law]] (2011–); expert in [[election law]] and [[campaign finance]]
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* [[Laurie Levenson|Laurie L. Levenson]] – professor, [[Loyola Law School]]; TV legal commentator, gained fame during Rodney King and O.J. Simpson trials
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* [[Susan Westerberg Prager]] – former Dean of the School of Law (1982–1998) – one of the first female law school deans; Professor at the UCLA School of Law (1972–1998, 2001–2006); Provost of [[Dartmouth College]] (1998–2001); President of [[Occidental College]] (2006–2007), Executive Director of [[Association of American Law Schools]] (2008–2013); Dean of [[Southwestern Law School]] (2013–)
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* [[Eugene Volokh]] – UCLA Law professor, legal commentator and expert in constitutional law
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====Business and private practice====
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* [[Val Ackerman]] – first female president of [[USA Basketball]] (2005–2008); President of the [[Women's National Basketball Association|WNBA]] (1996–2005)
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* [[Leslie Abramson]] – [[Criminal defense lawyer|criminal defense attorney]] who defended [[Lyle and Erik Menendez]] and [[Phil Spector]]
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*[[Ann Baskins]] – General Counsel, [[Hewlett-Packard]] (2000–2006)
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* [[Harland Braun]] – criminal defense attorney who defended [[John Landis]] and [[George Folsey, Jr.]] against [[manslaughter]] charges in the ''[[Twilight Zone: The Movie]]'' case
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*[[Antonia Hernández]] – president and CEO of the [[California Community Foundation]], former president and general counsel, [[MALDEF]]
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* [[John Howard (public health administrator)|John Howard]] – director of the [[National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health]] (2002–2008, 2009–)
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* [[Stewart Kwoh]] – founder and executive director of the [[Asian Pacific American Legal Center]]
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* [[Brian Lee (entrepreneur)|Brian Lee]] - entrepreneur, founder of [[LegalZoom]] and [[The Honest Company]]
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* [[Abraham M. Lurie]], developer of [[Marina del Rey]]
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* [[Stewart Resnick]] – president and CEO of [[The Wonderful Company]]
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* [[Michael D. Rich|Michael Rich]] – president and CEO, [[RAND Corporation|RAND Corp.]]
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* [[Nelson Rising]] - real estate development executive, former CEO of [[Catellus Development Corporation]]
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* [[Martine Rothblatt]] - co-founder of [[PanAmSat]] and [[Sirius Satellite Radio]], founder of [[United Therapeutics]]
 +
* [[David P. Steiner]] – CEO, [[Waste Management, Inc]]<ref>{{cite news|url=https://www.forbes.com/lists/2010/12/boss-10_David-P-Steiner_Z09T.html|work=Forbes|title=<nowiki>#251</nowiki> David P Steiner|date=April 28, 2010}}</ref> (2004-)
 +
*[[Stacey Snider]], Chair and CEO, Twentieth Century Fox Film (2015-)
 +
 
 +
====Government and politics====
 +
* [[Stewart Baker]] – Assistant Secretary for Policy, [[United States Department of Homeland Security|U.S. Department of Homeland Security]] (2005–2009)
 +
* [[Howard Berman]] – United States Congressman from California
 +
* [[Peter Carlisle]] – Former [[Mayor of Honolulu]] (2010-2013) and [[Prosecuting Attorney of Honolulu]] (1996-2010)<ref>[http://www.ndaa-apri.org/ndaa/profile/peter_carlisle_jan_feb_2004.html Peter B. Carlisle] {{Webarchive|url=https://web.archive.org/web/20071219101345/http://www.ndaa-apri.org/ndaa/profile/peter_carlisle_jan_feb_2004.html |date=2007-12-19 }}, National District Attorneys Association. Accessed December 3, 2007.</ref>
 +
* [[Anna Caballero]] – Secretary of the [[California State and Consumer Services Agency]] (2011–2016), member of the [[California State Assembly]] (2006–2010, 2016-)
 +
* [[Lou Correa]] - California State Assemblyman, 69th District (1998-2004); California State Senator, 34th District (2006-2014); member of the U.S. House of Representatives from California's 46th Congressional District (2016-)
 +
* [[David Dawson (politician)|David Dawson]] – member from the 14th District, [[Iowa House of Representatives]] (2013–)
 +
*[[Janet Dhillon]] –  member of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (2017–)
 +
* [[Roger Dickinson]] - member of the [[California State Assembly]] (2010-2014)
 +
* [[Mike Eng]] - member of the [[California State Assembly]] (2006-2012)
 +
* [[Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher]] - member of the [[California State Assembly]] (2013-)
 +
* [[Kirsten Gillibrand]] – United States Senator from New York (2009-)
 +
* [[Rachel Goslins]] - executive director, [[President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities]] (2009-2016)
 +
* [[Casey Gwinn]] - [[San Diego City Attorney]], (1996-2004)
 +
* [[Andrei Iancu]] - [[Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property]] and Director of the [[United States Patent and Trademark Office]] (USPTO) (2018-)
 +
* [[George David Kieffer]] - president, Board of Governors, [[California Community Colleges]] (1983-1985) and chair, [[Regents of the University of California]] (2017-)
 +
* [[Susan Liebeler]] - Commissioner (1984-1988) and Chairman (1986-1988), [[United States International Trade Commission]]
 +
* [[Jerry M. Patterson]] – member of the U.S. House of Representatives from California's 38th Congressional District (1975–1985)
 +
* [[Marietta S. Robinson]] - Commissioner, [[U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission]] (2013-)
 +
* [[James E. Rogan]] – California State Assemblyman, 43rd District (1994–1996); Congressman from California's 27th Congressional District (1997-2001); [[Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property]] and Director of the [[United States Patent and Trademark Office|USPTO]] (2001–2004); Judge of the Los Angeles Superior Court (2006–)
 +
* [[Linda Sánchez]] – Congresswoman from California's 39th Congressional District (2002–)
 +
* [[Henry A. Waxman]] – Congressman from California's 30th Congressional District (1975–2013)
 +
* [[Jack Weiss]] – member, [[Los Angeles City Council]] (2001–2009)
 +
* [[Joshua D. Wright]] – commissioner, [[Federal Trade Commission]] (2013–)
 +
 
 +
====Judiciary====
 +
* [[Percy Anderson (judge)|Percy Anderson]] - United States district judge on the [[United States District Court for the Central District of California|U.S. District Court for the Central District of California]] (2002–)
 +
* [[John Arguelles]] - associate justice, [[Supreme Court of California]] (1987-1989)
 +
* [[Janice Rogers Brown]] – judge, [[United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit|D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals]] (2005–); former Associate Justice of the [[Supreme Court of California]] (1996–2005)
 +
* [[Joe Brown (judge)|Joe Brown]] – former judge of the Criminal Court of the Thirtieth Judicial District of Tennessee ([[Shelby County, Tennessee|Shelby County]]); star of [[court show]] ''[[Judge Joe Brown]]'' (1998–2013)
 +
* [[Audrey B. Collins]] - associate justice, [[California Courts of Appeal|California Court of Appeal for the Second Appellate District]] (2014-); former United States district judge on the [[United States District Court for the Central District of California|U.S. District Court for the Central District of California]] (1994–2014)
 +
* [[Gil Garcetti]] - Former [[Los Angeles County District Attorney]] (1992-2000)
 +
* [[Dolly M. Gee]] – United States district judge on the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California (2010-)
 +
* [[Andrew Guilford]] – United States district judge on the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California (2006-)
 +
* [[Philip S. Gutierrez]] – United States district judge on the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California (2007-)
 +
* [[José Huizar]] - member from the [[Los Angeles City Council District 14|14th District]], [[Los Angeles City Council]], (2005–)
 +
* [[Sandra Ikuta]] – judge, [[United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit|Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals]] (2006–)
 +
* [[Robert Clive Jones]] – Chief Judge, [[United States District Court for the District of Nevada|U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada]] (2003–)
 +
* [[William B. Keene]] - Former California Superior Court Judge and presiding judge on the [[court show]] [[Divorce Court]].
 +
* [[William Duffy Keller]] - United States district judge on the [[United States District Court for the Central District of California|U.S. District Court for the Central District of California]] (1984–)
 +
* [[Alex Kozinski]] – Chief Judge, Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (1985–2017)
 +
* [[Alicia Limtiaco]] – [[United States Attorney]] of [[Guam]]
 +
* [[Jeffrey T. Miller]] – judge, [[United States District Court for the Southern District of California|U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California]] (1997–2010), Senior Judge (2010–)
 +
* [[Salvador Mendoza, Jr.]] - United States district judge on the [[United States District Court for the Eastern District of Washington|U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Washington]] (2014-)
 +
* [[Dorothy Wright Nelson]] – Senior Judge, [[United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit|Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals]] (1979–); former Dean of the [[University of Southern California School of Law]] (1969–1980)
 +
* [[Jacqueline Nguyen]] – judge, Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (2012–), United States district judge on the [[United States District Court for the Central District of California]] (2009–2012)
 +
* [[Kim McLane Wardlaw]] – judge, Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (1998–)
 +
* [[Paul J. Watford]] – judge, Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (2012–)
 +
 
 +
====Entertainment====
 +
 
 +
* [[John Branca]] –  entertainment lawyer who specializes in representing rock and roll acts, as well as independent investors, music publishing catalogs, and independent music labels
 +
* [[Thomas Bliss]] – motion picture producer with credits on over 30 films, including ''[[The Hurricane (1999 film)|The Hurricane]]'' and ''[[Air Force One (film)|Air Force One]]''
 +
* [[Jeff Cohen (actor)|Jeff Cohen]] – entertainment lawyer best known for work as [[child actor]] in ''[[The Goonies]]'' (1985)
 +
* [[Blye Pagon Faust]] - Academy Award-winning film producer best known for ''[[Spotlight (film)|Spotlight]]'' (2015)
 +
* [[Robert Fitzpatrick (lawyer)|Robert Fitzpatrick]] – entertainment attorney, film producer, and music executive; President of [[Allied Artists International]]
 +
* [[Cynthia Gouw]] – television show host, news anchor, reporter, actress, and model
 +
* [[Chip Johannessen]] – writer and producer for several popular television shows
 +
* [[John Kerr (actor)|John Kerr]] - Tony Award-winning actor best known for ''[[Tea and Sympathy (play)|Tea and Sympathy]]''
 +
* [[Kalyanee Mam]] – director and producer of the award-winning documentary ''[[A River Changes Course]]''
 +
* [[George Mastras]] – Emmy Award-winning writer and producer of AMC's ''[[Breaking Bad]]''
 +
* [[Stephan Pastis]] – creator of the comic strip ''[[Pearls Before Swine (comics)|Pearls Before Swine]]''
 +
* [[Kelly Perdew]] – winner of Season 2 of ''[[The Apprentice (U.S. TV series)|The Apprentice]]''
 +
* [[Robert Rotstein]] - entertainment attorney and novelist
 +
* [[Stacey Snider]] - formerly served as co-chair or chair of three film studios: [[20th Century Fox]], [[DreamWorks Pictures|DreamWorks]], and [[Universal Pictures|Universal]]
 +
* [[Howard K. Stern]] –  entertainment lawyer who was the former domestic partner, attorney and agent of model and actress Anna Nicole Smith.
 +
* [[Lauren Woodland]] – Emmy Award-nominated actress
 +
 
 +
====Other====
 +
* [[Vincent Bugliosi]] – Attorney and writer of non-fiction works as ''[[Helter Skelter (book)|Helter Skelter]]'' and ''[[The Betrayal of America|The Betrayal of America: How the Supreme Court Undermined the Constitution and Chose Our President]]''.
 +
* [[Cara Dunne-Yates]] – blind [[Paralympic Games|Paralympic]] athlete
 +
* [[Julie Heldman]] (born 1945) - tennis player, ranked # 5 in the world
 +
* [[Lowell Milken]] – co-founder and chairman of the [[Milken Family Foundation]]
 +
* [[Karen I. Tse]] – [[human rights]] activist and [[social entrepreneur]]
 +
 
 +
===Faculty===
 +
 
 +
====Current====
 +
*
 +
* [[Khaled Abou El Fadl]] – Omar and Azmeralda Alfi Distinguished Professor of Law and expert in [[Usul al-fiqh|Islamic Jurisprudence]]; Chairman of Islamic Studies Department at UCLA<ref>[http://www.international.ucla.edu/person.asp?Facultystaff_ID=429 UCLA International Institute] {{Webarchive|url=https://web.archive.org/web/20140102192648/http://www.international.ucla.edu/person.asp?Facultystaff_ID=429 |date=2014-01-02 }}</ref>
 +
* [[Stephen Bainbridge]] – expert on corporations and business law
 +
*[https://law.ucla.edu/faculty/faculty-profiles/asli-u-bali/ Asli Bâli] – expert on human rights, public international law, comparative constitutional law
 +
*[[Ann E. Carlson]] – expert on U.S. environmental law and policy
 +
* [[Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw]] – founding coordinator of the "Critical Race Theory Workshop" movement; Also teaches at [[Columbia Law School]]
 +
*[https://law.ucla.edu/faculty/faculty-profiles/ingrid-v-eagly/ Ingrid Eagly] – expert on immigration law, criminal justice, public interest lawyering
 +
*[https://law.ucla.edu/faculty/faculty-profiles/cheryl-i-harris/ Cheryl Harris] – expert on critical race theory, civil rights
 +
*[[Jill R. Horwitz]] – expert on health law, economics, and policy as well as the law of nonprofit organization
 +
* [[Lynn M. LoPucki]] – Security Pacific Bank Professor of Law. LoPucki's Bankruptcy Research Database provides data for empirical work bankruptcy
 +
*[[Jennifer Mnookin]] – expert on [[evidence (law)]]
 +
* [[Hiroshi Motomura]] – expert on [[immigration law]]
 +
* [[David Nimmer]] – expert on [[copyright]] law
 +
* [[Frances Olsen]] – expert on [[feminist legal theory]]
 +
* [[Seana Shiffrin]] – expert on [[philosophy of law]]
 +
*[https://law.ucla.edu/faculty/faculty-profiles/kirk-j-stark/ Kirk Stark] – expert on tax law
 +
* [[Eugene Volokh]] – author of textbooks on First Amendment law and academic legal writing; author of over 45 law review articles; founder of [[The Volokh Conspiracy]] blog
 +
* [[Adam Winkler]] – Author of ''Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America'' and ''We the Corporations: How Corporate America Won Its Civil Rights''
 +
 
 +
====Former====
 +
*[[Richard Abel (lawyer)|Richard L. Abel]] – member of the faculty since 1974; expert on [[sociology of law]]
 +
*[[Brainerd Currie]] – professor (1949–1952); expert on the [[conflict of laws in the United States]]
 +
* [[Jesse Dukeminier]] – professor (1963–2003); expert on property law, wills, trusts, and estates
 +
*[https://law.ucla.edu/faculty/faculty-profiles/carole-e-goldberg/ Carole Goldberg] – professor (1972-2018) expert on federal indian law and tribal legal systems
 +
*[https://law.ucla.edu/faculty/faculty-profiles/gerald-lopez/ Gerald López] –  professor (1978-2018) lawyering for social change,
 +
* [[James L. Malone (diplomat)|James L. Malone]] – associate dean (1961–1967); later became [[Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs]] (1981–1985)
 +
* [[Mari Matsuda]] – first female Asian-American law professor to obtain tenure at any law school in the United States, while teaching at UCLA Law in 1998
 +
* [[Richard Maxwell (academic)|Richard C. Maxwell]] – Dean of the School of Law (1958–1969)
 +
* [[Melville Nimmer|Melville B. Nimmer]] – professor (1962–1985); expert on U.S. [[copyright]] law and father of David Nimmer
 +
* [[Cruz Reynoso]] – professor (1991–2001), former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of California (1982-1987)
 +
* [[Michael H. Schill]] – dean and professor (2004–2009), expert on property law and urban planning; became president of the [[University of Oregon]] in 2015
 +
* [[Lynn Stout]] – professor (2001–2012); expert on corporate law, securities, and derivatives
 +
*[http://newsroom.ucla.edu/stories/in-memoriam-william-warren-dean-emeritus-of-ucla-school-of-law William Warren] – professor (1959-1972, 1975-1994); dean from 1975-1982, expert on commercial law
 +
 
 +
==References==
 +
{{Reflist|2}}
 +
 
 +
==External links==
 +
* {{Official website|http://www.law.ucla.edu|UCLA School of Law}}
 +
 
 +
{{UCLA}}
 +
{{California law schools accredited by the American Bar Association}}
 +
{{Law Schools of the Southwest}}
 +
 
 +
{{coord|34.073023|-118.438443|type:edu_globe:earth_region:US-CA|display=title}}
 +
 
 +
[[Category:ABA-accredited law schools in California|California, Los Angeles]]
 +
[[Category:University of California, Los Angeles|Law school]]
 +
[[Category:Educational institutions established in 1949]]
 +
[[Category:1949 establishments in California]]

Revision as of 23:20, March 26, 2020

University of California, Los Angeles School of Law
COVID-19 Information
In-person classes canceled? Yes
Graduation ceremonies canceled?
Temporary pass/fail grading? Yes[1]
All Spring 2020 courses, except for clinic courses or other courses that completed most of their evaluation prior to the COVID-19 disruption (i.e. prior to Spring Break), will be graded pass/fail.


Parent school University of California, Los Angeles
Established 1949
School type Public
Endowment $1,880 million
Dean Jennifer L. Mnookin
Location Los Angeles, CA, US
Enrollment 999
Faculty 76 (full time)
35 (part time)
(See List)
USNWR ranking 15
Bar pass rate 88%
LSAT 75th% 170
Median LSAT 168
LSAT 25th% 165
Undergrad. GPA 75th% 3.87
Median Undergrad. GPA 3.77
Undergrad. GPA 25th% 3.56
Annual tuition (subsidized) $44,922
Annual tuition (unsubsidized) $54,767
Basis for tuition subsidy State residency
Website
Outlines 15 (See List)
Loading map...

University of California, Los Angeles School of Law is located in Los Angeles, CA

The UCLA School of Law, also referred to as UCLA Law, is one of 12 professional schools[2] at the University of California, Los Angeles. UCLA Law has been consistently ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top 20 law schools in the United States since the inception of the U.S. News rankings in 1987. Its 17,000 alumni include more judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit than any other law school, as well as leaders in private law practice, government service, the judiciary, sports and entertainment law, and public interest law. As part of a renowned public university, the school's mission is to provide an excellent legal education while expanding access to the legal professional to those who otherwise would not be able to pursue a legal degree.[3] The dean of the school is Jennifer L. Mnookin., an evidence scholar who joined the UCLA Law faculty in 2005 and became the school's ninth dean, and third female dean, in 2015.[4]

History

Founded in 1949, the UCLA School of Law is the third oldest of the five law schools within the University of California system.

In the 1930s, initial efforts to establish a law school at UCLA went nowhere as a result of resistance from UC President Robert Gordon Sproul, and because UCLA's supporters eventually refocused their efforts on first adding medical and engineering schools.[5]

During the mid-1940s, the impetus for the creation of the UCLA School of Law emerged from outside of the UCLA community. Assemblyman William Rosenthal of Boyle Heights (on the other side of Los Angeles from UCLA) conceived of and fought for the creation of the first public law school in Southern California as a convenient and affordable alternative to the expensive private law school at USC.[6][7][8] Rosenthal's first attempt in 1945 failed, but his second attempt was able to gain momentum when the State Bar of California and the UCLA Alumni Association announced their support for the bill.[7] On July 18, 1947, Governor Earl Warren authorized the appropriation of $1 million for the construction of a new law school at UCLA by signing Assembly Bill 1361 into state law.[6][7][8]

The search for the law school's first dean was difficult and delayed its opening by a year.[7] UCLA's Law School Planning Committee prioritized merit, while the then-conservative Regents of the University of California prioritized political beliefs.[6] Another factor was a simultaneous deanship vacancy at Berkeley Law.[7] Near the end of 1948, the Committee finally identified a sufficiently conservative candidate willing to take the job: L. Dale Coffman, then the dean of Vanderbilt University Law School.[6] The Regents believed Coffman would help bring balance to the UCLA campus, which they saw as overrun by Communists.[6]

Dean Coffman was able to recruit several distinguished faculty to UCLA, including Roscoe Pound, Brainerd Currie, Rollin M. Perkins, and Harold Verrall.[6][7] To build a law library, he hired Thomas S. Dabagh, then the law librarian of the Los Angeles County Law Library.[6][7] The UCLA School of Law officially opened in September 1949 in temporary quarters in former military barracks behind Royce Hall, and moved into a permanent home upon the completion of the original Law Building in 1951.[6][7][8]

Coffman's deanship did not end well, due to his vindictive and strongly prejudiced personality.[6][7][8] One sign of early trouble was when he drove out Dabagh in 1952 after they could not bridge their fundamental differences over how to run the law library, which was widely regarded around the UCLA community as contributing to Dabagh's early death in 1959.[6] On September 21, 1955, the faculty revolted in the form of a memorandum to Chancellor Raymond B. Allen alleging that Coffman was categorically refusing to hire Jews or anyone he perceived to be leftist, and that the school's reputation was deteriorating because Coffman's abrasive personality had led to excessive faculty turnover.[6][8] On May 24, 1956, Coffman was stripped of his deanship after a lengthy investigation by a panel of deans of his biases and his "dictatorial, undemocratic, and autocratic" management style.[6] He remained on the faculty until his forced retirement in 1973, but continued to face allegations as late as 1971 that he was "an unreconstructed McCarthyite and pro-segregationist."[8]

Coffman's successor was Richard C. Maxwell, who served as the second dean of UCLA Law from 1958 to 1969.[9] Dean Maxwell "presided over happier, more harmonious years of institutional growth,"[8] and it was under his deanship that UCLA became "the youngest top-ranked law school in the country."[9] Dabagh's successor, Louis Piacenza, was able to grow the law school's library collection to 143,000 volumes by May 1963, which at that time was the 14th largest law school library in the United States.[8]

By 1963, the law school had 600 students in a building designed for 550, and the Law Building's deficiencies had become all too evident, such as a complete lack of air conditioning.[8] In October 1963, the law school administration announced a major remodeling and expansion project, which added air conditioning and a new wing to the building. During the 1960s, the law school grew so quickly that the new wing was already insufficient upon its completion in January 1967.[8] From its founding to the end of the 20th century, UCLA Law struggled with severe overcrowding, as librarians, faculty, staff, and as many as 18 student organizations—at one point, more than any other law school in the United States—competed for limited space in the Law Building for books, classes, conferences, and offices.[8] After four grueling years of construction, the chronic space shortage was ultimately relieved by the completion of the new Hugh and Hazel Darling Law Library on January 22, 2000.[8]

Academics

UCLA Law has approximately 950 students in its Juris Doctor (J.D.) program and 200 students in its Masters of Law (LL.M.) program, which is popular among foreign students intending to take the California Bar Exam. It also offers a Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) program for students who already have a J.D. and hope to become law professors.

The school was a pioneer in clinical legal education and today offers a strong experiential education program. Through clinical courses and related offerings, the school gives students the opportunity to directly represent clients in a variety of settings while under expert supervision. UCLA Law's clinics also provide service to many people who cannot afford to pay for their own legal services, including veterans, the homeless, and indigent individuals appearing in criminal and immigration courts. In 2017, the school opened the Documentary Film Legal Clinic and Music Industry Clinic, which provide legal services to aspiring visual journalists, musicians and entrepreneurs in the arts, and the Veterans Justice Clinic at the West Los Angeles VA Medical Center.

UCLA Law offers the only Critical Race Studies program in the country, focusing on the intersection between race and law. It also has a robust public interest program, offering TK. Its most prominent centers, programs and institutes include the Critical Race Studies program, the David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy; the Emmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment; the Lowell Milken Institute on Business Law and Policy; the Promise Institute for Human Rights; the Resnick Center for Food Law and Policy; the Williams Institute on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Public Policy; and the Ziffren Center on Media, Entertainment, Technology and Sports Law.

Students can elect to specialize in Business Law and Policy, Entertainment Law, Environmental Law, Public Interest Law, Critical Race Studies, and Law and Philosophy. The roughly 300 students who begin Law School at UCLA every year are divided into sections to encourage a sense of community. Students take all of their first year courses with their sections.[10]

Several joint degree programs are available, which require four years of study and result in the simultaneous award of a Juris Doctor and master's degree in Afro-American Studies, American Indian Studies, Law and Management, Public Health, Public Policy, Philosophy, Social Welfare, and Urban Planning.[11]

Faculty and Students

UCLA School of Law has a faculty of over 100 members with expertise in all major disciplines of law, representing "one of the most diverse in the country."[12] Thirteen members of the school's tenured faculty have been recognized for being the most-cited scholars in their areas of specialty.[13] The school faculty is ranked 11th[14] for scholarship, up from 15th in 2010 and 13th in 2013.

In 2018, 6,243 students applied to attend UCLA Law, and 311 were enrolled.[15] The average LSAT score for members of the entering Class of 2018 is 168. The average LSAT score for students in the 75th percentile is 169, and 165 for students in the 25th percentile it is 165. The average GPA for members of the entering Class of 2018 is 3.72. The average GPA score for students in the 75th percentile is 3.85, and for students in the 25th percentile it is 3.52.

J.D. Entering Class of 2018 Profile[16]
  • 123 Undergraduate schools represented
  • 52% Female; 48% Male
  • 41% Students of color
  • 58% California Residents; 42% Non-residents
  • 10% majored in engineering, technology, science or math
  • 14% are the first in their families to have completed college

International Human Rights Law Program

The International Human Rights Law Program, founded in 2008, is an organization for human rights education, scholarship, advocacy, and policy-oriented research.[17] It includes the Sanela Diana Jenkins International Justice Clinic,[18] which assists in the apprehension and prosecution of alleged war criminals in Bosnia, initially focusing on the relations between Ratko Mladic, formerly head of the Bosnian Serb Army, and others accused of involvement in the Srebrenica massacre. Haris Silajdžić, President of Bosnia and Herzegovina, will work closely with the program.[19]

Location

File:UCLA School of Law south entrance.jpg
UCLA School of Law's south entrance facing Charles E. Young Drive East

UCLA School of Law is located on the UCLA campus in the Westwood area of Los Angeles.[20] The school is located approximately five miles from the Pacific Ocean and 12 miles from downtown Los Angeles. The UCLA campus sits in the foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains, between the communities of Brentwood to the west, Bel Air to the north, Holmby Hills to the east and Westwood to the south. The school is easily accessible via Wilshire Boulevard, Sunset Boulevard and Interstate 405.

The school proper is housed in a three-story brick building, with the library tower extending to four stories. A few offices, including the Office of Career Services, the Office of Admissions and the Office of Graduate Studies and International Programs, are housed in an adjacent building, Dodd Hall.

Rankings

Template:See also In 2019, US News & World Report ranked UCLA as 15th among U.S. law schools,[21] 4th in environmental law and 8th in tax law.[21]

According to Brian Leiter's Law School rankings, UCLA Law ranks 8th in the nation in terms of scholarly impact as measured by academic citations of tenure-stream faculty during the years 2009–2013.[22]

The Hollywood Reporter ranked UCLA the number one school for entertainment law in its inaugural 2012 rankings, and every year from 2014 through 2019.[23][24][25][26][27][28][29]

Bar passage rates

In July 2017, UCLA Law's bar passage was 88%,[15] compared to a statewide average for first-time test-takers of 62%.

American Bar Association data shows that (94%) of 2017 graduates had secured full-time, long-term, JD-required employment within ten months of graduation.

Journals

Journals and law reviews

  • UCLA Law Review
  • UCLA Asian/Pacific American Law Journal
  • UCLA Chicana/o-Latina/o Law Review
  • UCLA Criminal Justice Law Review
  • UCLA Disability Law Journal
  • UCLA Dukeminier Awards Journal of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law
  • UCLA Entertainment Law Review
  • UCLA Indigenous Peoples' Journal of Law, Culture & Resistance
  • UCLA Journal of Environmental Law and Policy
  • UCLA Journal of International Law & Foreign Affairs
  • UCLA Journal of Islamic and Near Eastern Law
  • UCLA Journal of Law & Technology
  • UCLA National Black Law Journal
  • UCLA Pacific Basin Law Journal
  • UCLA Women's Law Journal

Notable people

Alumni (Graduates)

Academia

Business and private practice

Government and politics

Judiciary

Entertainment

Other

Faculty

Current

Former

References

  1. https://www.reddit.com/r/LawSchool/comments/fjp4kt/complete_list_of_grading_changes_corona_spring/fllw7o5/
  2. Graduate & Professional Education | UCLA,
  3. How Does University of California--Los Angeles School of Law Rank Among America's Best Law Schools?,
  4. Jennifer Mnookin named new dean of UCLA School of Law,
  5. . (2011). UCLA: The First Century. Los Angeles: Third Millennium Publishing.
  6. 6.00 6.01 6.02 6.03 6.04 6.05 6.06 6.07 6.08 6.09 6.10 6.11  Thomas S. Dabagh and the Institutional Beginnings of the UCLA Law Library: A Cautionary TaleLaw Library Journal  (Summer 2003)
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 . (2011). UCLA: The First Century. Los Angeles: Third Millennium Publishing.
  8. 8.00 8.01 8.02 8.03 8.04 8.05 8.06 8.07 8.08 8.09 8.10 8.11  Growing Pains: The History of the UCLA Law Library, 1949-2000Law Library Journal  (May 2016)
  9. 9.0 9.1  The UCLA School of Law - Origin, Conflict, and GrowthCalifornia Legal History  (2016)
  10. Cynthia L. Cooper, The Insider's Guide to the Top Fifteen Law Schools (New York: Doubleday, 1990), 343 & 345.
  11. Joint Degree Programs, UCLA Law School website
  12. Cooper, 345.
  13. 13 UCLA Law Faculty Among Most Cited Legal Scholars,
  14.  Scholarly Impact of Law School Faculties in 2018: Updating the Leiter Score Ranking for the Top Third,
  15. 15.0 15.1 UCLA Law Class Profile,
  16. School Facts,
  17. International Human Rights Law Program | Centers & Programs | UCLA Law
  18. “Bosnian's $4 million funds UCLA war crimes clinic,” San Francisco Chronicle, September 18, 2008
  19. UCLA Today Online, September 22, 2008
  20. Cooper, 359.
  21. 21.0 21.1 Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named US News
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External links

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